Why fitness trackers and ad metrics rarely work

A wrist with a Samsung Gear Fit on it
Measure your end goal.

“Samsung Gear Fit unboxing” by Vernon Chan is licensed under CC BY 4.0

 

Many people are quick to defend fitness trackers such as FitBit. “It makes me walk more!”, many forum posts conclude. But if you probe these people deeper and ask what their goal is, they will say “To lose weight.” “Are you losing weight?” I inquire. “Well, no.”

 

The problem with this calculation is simple; more steps do not equal lost weight.

 

The actual formula is:

 

More activity + less caloric intake = losing weight

 

So fitness trackers are a part of the picture and can help with more activity, but it’s not the only factor needed to reach a weight loss goal.

 

Similarly, if your goal is sales, judging your marketing campaign by one metric isn’t going to help.

 

  • Awareness doesn’t direct correlate to sales
  • Clicks don’t equal sales

 

The actual formula varies depending on goal and industry, but typically it looks something like this:

 

Quality product/service that people need/desire + effective promotion + correct price point + available when/where the sale could happen = sales

 

Before you decide what you are going to measure, decide your goal and measure backwards from that.

 

Further reading:

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